Received my copy of the newly published "The K-Frame Revolver, The S&W Phenomenom Volume II", by Timothy J. Mullin.  I look forward to many hours pouring over details of one of my favorite handguns, the K Frame Smith.  Almost could be called the perfect handgun, fits the hand, easily controllable, and quite good looking also.  This gun in it's many variations has been in production for over one hundred years, and there are so many variations a collector could add specimens for years and not get them all.  

picture of the K-Frame Revolver book

I look forward to reviewing this 520 page, well illustrated tome on the K-frame.  I was also able to contribute to this book in a small way with some pictures of a Webley 38/200 for comparison to the M&P Lend Lease guns, and a section on Spanish copies of S&Ws.  As always, this Collector Grade Publication is a feast for those with a historical or technical frame of mind.

picture of book

While researching the Apache Revolver and the British Commandos I came to realize how fond of brass knuckles the commandos seem to be.  Their equipment consisted of at least one fighting knife, the most famous of which was the Fairbairn Sykes Fighting Knife, but almost all the other knives they used had brass knuckles as part of the handle.  Some of these knives were leftovers from WW1, but one of the most unusual and interesting is the knuckle knife used by the Middle Eastern Commando.

picture of Commando knife

From Roy Shadbolt's collection

 It is hard to say how the Commandos that fought in the Middle East came by these knives, but I suspect they were locally sourced because of urgent need, and failure of wartime logistics.  The Commando's Death's Head knuckle knife came from Egyptian shops.  The blade was made from left over WW1 German bayonets, something common in that part of the world after the defeat of the Ottoman Empire during WW1.  The Ottomans and Turks were German allies and used a lot of their equipment. The handles follow closely the same pattern as each other, but had to have come from a number of different shops.

picture of Commando cap badge

The Middle East Commandos even used a representation of this knife as their cap badge.  It's a unique symbol of a gritty time in history.  Knives and cap badges are still available but not cheap. Real ones are rare and many reproductions abound.

Men of No. 51 Commando